Can you get Facebook to work for you, or is it all a waste of time and money?

I read this blogpost today, over on Queer Ideas: “If Facebook isn’t the future of social marketing, what is?“. Now – the author of the post, Mark Phillips, is a brilliant, brilliant man, and normally I agree with everything he says – as should you. On this one however, I have to somewhat disagree.

Mark references a report from Forrester, that says most organisations (also companies, I believe?) do not get much engagement back from social networks such as Facebook and twitter. The report (as I understand from Marks words), sort of suggests that this is a waste of time.

I have no doubt that the research is correct and that most businesses do indeed not get much back from their social channels. It is the conclusions – that this is the fault of the channel – I absolutely disagree with.

You see, most organisations and businesses are completely doing it wrong.

How many organisations do you know, who work with a comprehensive publishing plan where each and every Facebook post has a goal that is then measured and analysed?

How many organisations do you know who re-write each and every Facebook post 5 times, and put as much care into these words as words in an ad?

How many organisations do you know, who has a defined personality of who they are in social channels, that makes them recognizeable?

Not that many I will presume. And that is why they are not getting much back from their social channels.

Shit in, shit out.

As Facebook grows, it is only going to get harder to get organic reach. With 500 friends and 1-200 pages people follow, there are tens of thousands of posts Facebook could choose to show in your newsfeed. It’s only going to choose the best stuff. The stuff you usually interact with and find interesting. How do you expect to be one of those top 1-2% of posts, if you are not putting in the time and effort? You are not the pictures of the very cute babies in their lives. So you have to work harder.

You have to take the time to reply to those who do something for you. Even if there are 20.000 of them over a two week-period. You have to make sure you don’t talk like a robot. Like a press release. You have to make sure you don’t bore people to death. You have to become a personality. You have to plan, and work on it, and for the love of [insert your deity], you have to send people to good landing pages! Most landing pages are not prioritised, they are not user friendly, and they are not adapted for mobile. And from Facebook, most of your visitors are mobile. You have to do the work.

If you do, Facebook is one of the most rewarding channels. The Norwegian Cancer Society regularly gets a return on investment of about 8 when they advertise on Facebook. Most of that from donors who are new to the database. Those results are possible because they have done the ground work. I have worked with clients where we have increased organic reach tenfold just by paying closer attention to what is put out there.

I’m fairly certain that if you sent out a piece of direct mail that was a first draft, with a return form made of toilet paper, without a return envelope, where half the text was hidden behind another piece of paper – to people who do not know a single thing about what you do – that wouldn’t work so well either.

So that’s it. Fix your website, and put in the time and work to the social channels. Realise that just like not everyone opens the envelope you send them in the mail, not everyone is going to see your every facebook post. That’s okay. That doesn’t stop you from trying.

Do that, and I’m sure Forrester will have different results later on. 

Cold-water-challenge raises heck-load of money: Number bonanza!

Sometime around May 1st, the good people of Norway started jumping into the cold water, naturally daring their friends to repeat the feat or suffer the consequences. Consequences started out being owing someone a beer, a bottle of wine or a dinner. But then, somehow, sometime, someone thought: “well this all seems a bit selfish, I cannot in good conscience tell my friends to freeze or pay me. But hey! I can ask my friends to freeze or pay THE CANCER SOCIETY!”.

And, lo and behold, pay the good people of Norway did. In a couple of hours, I went from vaguely registering that “hm, perhaps there is quite a bit more donating going on today than usually”, to being blown away an avalanche of good deeds.

obligatory cat-gif of surprised cat

This is me. Surprised by an avalanche of good deeds.

Over the course of two weeks, 3,5 million NOK  (approx. US$600.000, €430.000 and £350.000) was donated to the Norwegian Cancer Society alone. Keep in mind that there are only 5 million Norwegians all together, and quite a few of those are bound to be infants or very, very old. So this is a momentous amount, actually more than 10% of what we raise in our annual two-week fundraiser Krafttak mot kreft, which takes a year to plan and has 20.000 people knocking on doors.

This amount of “random” money suddenly flowing in is flat out insane. But lordy-lord we’re happy about it! Actually we’re so happy that we too jumped into the cold waters of Oslo, at 850.000 NOK (we thought we were at the peak. We were oh-so-wrong). I’m in this bunch of my colleagues jumping in. I’m aqua-phobic (and it’s COLD), so I expect high praise for this, I’ll have you know.

Number one stat you need to know: Without mobile, you’re toast

More than 70% of all donations given came from a mobile phone – not even counting tablets. This includes text-donations and credit card donations from a mobiles browser. I will say that again, as it needs repeating. I shit you not:

More than 70% of all #Hoppihavet-donations came from a mobile phone!

Have a look at this beauty of a pretty stacked graph:

Graph showing biggest number of donations came from text and mobile web.

Number of donation by medium. Text is pink, web-donations (credit card) split into mobile (green), tablet (purple) and desktop/laptop (blue). Note how Eurovision Song Contest-day makes a noticeable dip in donations!

That ginormous pink slab, is the number of text donations. And we’re not talking micro donation texts, the majority are 200 NOK (US$34, €25, £20) a piece. Add to that the green slab which are donations made by credit card on our website in a mobile browser, and you have 70-75% of the pie. On mobile phones. In other words; money that would not have come had we not been optimized for mobile.

Looking at the beginning and the end of this graph, where the blue desktop-line is the dominant one, tells you a lot. That is the status quo of everyday donating. But as soon as spur-of-the-moment takes over, as soon as donating becomes spontaneous, mobile is the absolute go-to-medium for most of us. Again we see that context is more important than device.

More than half the donations came from text

More than half the donations came from text

When donating becomes spontaneous, mobile is the go-to-medium.

Our webpage is responsive, and thus easy to navigate on a phone. Our donation forms are available to mobile users. Our text-to-donate codes are easy to find. If this was not the case, we wouldn’t have gotten half the donations we did.

Fun facts and sums:

  • On the busiest days of this absolute banana-fest of giving, more than 10% of ALL visitors to the cancer society web page made a donation. I cannot begin to stress how out of the ordinary that is. Our site is made primarily for patients and next of kin. Most come to check out symptoms etc, they do not come to donate.
  • For the first two weeks of May, The “Thank you for donating”-page (that you only get to after giving) was the fifth most viewed page on the entire Cancer Society website.
  •  The busiest days saw 1 donation pr minute on average (counting all 24 hours).
  • The busiest hours saw roughly 4-6 donations pr minute
  • 70% of mobile views came from an Apple product (no surprise)
  • 100% of the 1 person who visited from a blackberry donated. Thank you!
  • Eurovision Song Contest (May 10th) made a more noticeable dip in donations than Norways Constitution Day (May 17th), see graph above.People were apparently too busy voting for Conchita to donate.
  • 57% of web conversions came from google. Which means that even as people sit down to make a donation to the cancer society, which has a URL exactly like our name, people still google the task and come in that way. The second biggest source are the 18% who came directly by typing the url, followed by 13 % who came from facebook. Of donors who came from facebook, 70% where from the mobile view.

What can we learn from this?

Well, if you’re looking for advice on how to create some viral trend that makes the money roll in, I can’t help you. We didn’t start this, people did. And that’s why it worked, in my opinion. Just like the #Nomakeupselfie that got so big in the UK, the charities who benefited had nothing to do with starting it. That is one of my favorite things about digital fundraising; it’s utterly unpredictable and all you can do is be prepared. Paul deGregorio has written a beautiful little piece on these trends. I recommend you read it.

Here’s what I think are the important parts of what we do to be ready:

  • Near 24/7 social media surveillance. This means we pick up on emerging trends early, and can start to get ready as soon as we see something that has the potential to go big.
  • Knowing our numbers. Once we noticed something brewing i social media, we could immediately look at our analytics and confirm the trend. We could in a couple of minutes find out exactly how much (more than usual) had been given.
  • Information sharing. As soon as we picked up on this, the information about what, how much and relevant statements were sent out to all internal stakeholders. This way, we were ready to answers any questions from the press or public.
  • Being ready to jump. Don’t think that there is any way you can throw gas on these flames; you can’t. But if you’re good and lucky, you might be able to fuel it with some kindling. I think we managed that, by quickly acknowledging the trend in our social channels and in the press, keeping people updated on the amounts donated, thanking people in social media, and of course, by showing genuine joy and appreciation and jumping into the water ourselves.
  • Being ready for mobile! This one deserves an exclamation mark.
  • Sit back and let the people have fun. There’s not much you can do to make these things happen. So don’t try – you’ll only embarrass yourself. Be the facilitator when someone wants to do something for you, and be happy when you’re the benefactor of something amazing.

Let us all take a moment to reflect on the fact that PEOPLE ARE AWESOME!

 

Sharing is caring is cash

(Read this post in Norwegian here)

Earlier this year I found a little research project that Eventbrite had done on their own website. It proved the value of a share – for example every share of a purchase for a ticket to a consert or charity event produces 12 new dollars of revenue. Now, those of you who have heard one of my talks since then, have heard my rant on how on earth we are content to just have that little “f” or “t” in a quiet little corner of our websites if we know that each time someone pushes that button it gives us 12 new dollars. Why then, are we not actively asking people to share?!

It has, until recently, however just been my hypotheses that a more active pursuit of sharing would lead to to more revenue. But lo and behold; it is now Myth Confirmed.

Turns out JustGiving read the same article as I did, or at least thought of the same hypotheses, and decided to turn theory in to practice with some amazing results. For some time now, they have given donors little nudges and encouraged them to share the fact that they have donated to their friends, and telling them that this increases the chances of raising even more money.

The first month after these features were rolled out saw a 50 % increase in sharing! That in it self is great, meaning that their message have been spread much further than before. But the other number, the real number, the one we all care about, is even more amazing. This increase of sharing lead to an increase of 150.000 pounds in donations. £150.000! In one month!! We are talking real cash here. My rants are only going to get worse from now on. If I catch any of you without a rather prominent sharing-ask, I am going to smack you on the head.

And there is no reason to believe that this only applies to concert tickets and charity. If you ask someone – in the right way – to post a photo of the amazing shoes they just bought in your store, I’m pretty sure they will. You would probably appeal to their sense of pride and wish to brag, rather than their concience, but you get the picture. You’re losing money not asking people to share.

This is a great infographic from JustGiving, showing in detail how the money comes from different social websites. It also shows some very interesting differences in the average amount donated from the different sites and across different platforms. I am particularly curious to see some more intel on why there is such a big difference on the different average amounts from facebook desktop, facebook mobile and facebook app.

And below you can see Jonathan Waddingham’s full presentation of the sharing-project, source of the facts I’ve stated above!

How real people use social media to make a real impact

Since the tiny little share-button on this blog is obviously not enough: Please show your friends how smart and knowledgeable you are by sharing this blogpost to your networks;)